Learning for Life & Work

Learning for Life and Work has four strands; Personal Development, Citizenship, Education for Employability and Home Economics.  At Campbell college, Home Economics is delivered as a separate subject.

Personal Development

This strand aims to provide our students with both the safe environment in which to explore the fundamental questions about themselves and the world, and the guidance and support they need to develop informed choices and sound decision making skills.
 
It is delivered by a dedicated team of teachers during one 55 minute lesson over a two week period.  Important themes and topic areas are also supported and explored by the Head of Year and/or tutor in assemblies and tutor time.  Homework is not a requirement but teachers may set tasks to complement and reinforce themes which are covered in class.
 
Outside agencies also deliver talks on alcohol/drug abuse and relationships and sexuality.  At the moment we use the SHAHRP Project and Love for Life.

Local and Global Citizenship

This strand aims to help pupils to make sense of what they see and hear personally and through the media.  They are encouraged to look closely at real life situations, both at home and in the wider world, and to explore and express their own values and attitudes against internationally agreed human rights and social responsibilities.  Thinking more deeply about issues in the wider community helps young people to develop their own thinking, decision making and problem solving skills.  Guided and supported by the internationally recognised principles of equality, human rights, justice and democracy, they are encouraged to participate positively and effectively in society.   

Citizenship is delivered during one 55 minute lesson over a 2 week period for 13 weeks.  Important themes and topic areas are also supported and explored by the head of year in assemblies.  Homework is not a requirement but teachers may set tasks to complement and reinforce themes which are covered in class.

Education for employability

The Employability strand focuses on three themes:

  1. Work in the local and global economy.  Exploring work in the local and global economy allows young people opportunities to investigate the impact of the global market on Northern Ireland and to reflect on the implications for their personal career planning.
  2. Career management.  The concept of career is changing, moving away from the likelihood of a job for life to the expectation that individuals will experience several career changes. Exploring career management provides opportunities for young people to investigate future careers. It also teaches the importance of lifelong learning, self-marketing and effective personal career planning.
  3. Enterprise and entrepreneurship.  This provides opportunities for young people to investigate the need for employers and employees to demonstrate creativity and enterprise. It also allows them to identify and practise some of the skills and develop the attributes associated with being enterprising.

 
Education for employability is also delivered during one 55 minute lesson over a two week period.  Important themes and topic areas are also supported and explored by the head of year and/or tutor in assemblies and tutor time.  The careers department also plays an important part in career planning.  Homework is not a requirement but teachers may set tasks to complement and reinforce themes which are covered in class.

Certificate in preparation for working life

In year 10, all pupils sit the AQA LLW related exam entitled ‘certificate in preparation for working life’. 

A pass in the certificate is indicated by one of two levels, level 1 and level 2, of which level 2 is the higher.  A pass at level 1 is broadly equivalent to attainment of a GCSE short course at foundation tier.  A pass at level 2 is broadly equivalent to attainment of a GCSE short course at higher tier.

Written assessment – 1hr 30 mins (80% of overall assessment)
Section A – multiple choice
Section B – short sentence answers
Section C – longer, structured answers
Coursework – (20% of overall assessment)
A letter of application for a job
A CV
Notes on interview preparation
 
The subject content is divided into nine main compulsory sections.

  •  personal awareness
  •  healthy lifestyles for work-life balance
  •  relationships and the differences between people
  •  the changing world of work
  •  applying for jobs and courses
  •  economic and financial aspects of life
  •  employment opportunities
  •  enterprise activities
  •  hazard identification at home, on the roads and at work.

The course is delivered during one 55 minute lesson over a 2 week period.  In order for the course to be covered in one year, homework is set on a weekly basis.  The careers department also plays an important part in career planning.
 

Classroom environment and teaching 

At Campbell, Personal Development, Citizenship and Education for Employability underpin all aspects of teaching and learning.  To facilitate pupils’ learning in LLW:

  • The purpose of each lesson is made clear
  • Appropriate learning experiences are planned and meet the needs of all the pupils in the class
  • Learning experiences draw on pupils’ own experiences or existing knowledge and provide a range of opportunities for pupils to learn, practise and demonstrate skills, attitudes and knowledge and understanding
  • Time is given for pupils to reflect, consolidate and apply their learning
  • Pupils are encouraged to take responsibility for their own learning and to record their own progress
  • Attention is given to developing a safe and secure classroom climate

Within the department, we aim to use a range of teaching and learning styles which promote active learning and a secure learning environment in which pupils are able to take part in discussion to resolve conflicts or set agreed classroom rules of behaviour.  We also offer our pupils the opportunity to hear visiting speakers such as the PSNI, Love for Life, Jackie Burke and the YMCA. 

LLW is also developed through activities and whole school events e.g. The school council and the pastoral support team.
 
We also establish confidentiality in the classroom and create opportunities for pupils to express their opinions on the following LLW issues:

  • Relationship and sexuality issues
  • Child protection
  • Diversity
  • Discrimination
  • Disability
  • Drugs
  • Personal hygiene
  • Bereavement and loss
  • Family change issues (divorce/unemployment)

We use verbal praise, merit cards, merits and whole class rewards to praise good work.  Teachers are also encouraged to raise the profile of LLW throughout the school by displaying good pieces of work on display boards.  Minor breaches are dealt with by the subject teacher e.g. Missing homework, no books, shouting out in class.  If issues persist, the co-ordinator of LLW is involved.  Departmental detentions take place on Tuesdays, 3:30pm-4:30pm.
 
As with any learning process, assessment of pupils’ development is important.  It provides information which indicates pupils’ progress and achievement and informs the development of the LLW programme.  Pupils do not pass or fail LLW but have the opportunity to reflect on their own learning and personal experiences and to set personal goals and agree strategies to reach them.  The process of assessment has a positive impact on pupils’ self awareness and self esteem.  In some cases teachers can observe and assess how pupils apply their knowledge, skills and understanding in simulated or real experiences.  There is no requirement for an end of unit assessment; however, teachers keep records of each child’s progress and report this to parents.

Links with the community

SHAHRP project, Love for Life, Northern Ireland Youth Forum, Bank of Ireland and Community PSNI have enriched the learning for life and work programme within the college.

E-safety

We rely on Ceop’s "thinkuknow" programme to teach pupils about e-safety.   There are films, presentations, games, lesson plans and posters covering a range of issues from grooming by child sex offenders to cyber bullying. All of these resources encourage young people to have fun with new technology, whilst staying in control of the risks. More importantly, they also teach young people where to go if they have any concerns.

Staff

Mr J Cupitt
Mrs M Debbadi
Mr G Fry
Mr M Chalkley
Mrs K Crooks
Miss J Mount (co-ordinator)
Mrs K Roberts
Mr D Styles
Mrs G Wilson